RSS

Category Archives: Deconstructed Food

Deconstructed BLT

Chef Karen: The letters “BLT” in our house mean genuine happiness to my husband! Even when I suggested our blog recipe this week was a “Deconstructed BLT”, he was happy. After you read Chef Jonathan’s blog, you will see that he obviously has the more creative cooking mind in this blogging duo. My BLT looked different on the plate but I didn’t move far from the original. I changed my usual “sandwich” into an appetizer. I toasted my bread, cut it into little circles, and cut my bacon and lettuce to size. I cut my tomatoes into little pieces, mixed them with mayonnaise and white wine vinegar (one of my new favs), added some salt and pepper and put it on top of the circles. Although deconstructed, the outcome was a happy grin from my husband. A+ in my book! 🙂

photo (4)

photo (5)

Chef Jonathan: My approach to this week’s deconstructed BLT was to turn it into something completely different. I wanted someone to eat this and not think “Oh, this reminds me of a BLT”, so I went with pasta. I cooked my pasta to ‘al dente’, then started on my bacon, cutting into 1/2 inch cubes, then sautéing with 1/2 and 1/2 butter and oil, seasoning as it cooks. Then I diced my tomatoes, adding to my prepared pasta sauce, adding minced garlic, my favourite herbs, and salt & pepper to taste. Tossing it all together, with some shredded cheese of course (it wouldn’t be pasta without) I put it in the oven for 25 minutes. Meanwhile, I did a classic chiffonade with my lettuce for a garnish, and voila a BLT pasta!

20130811-214948.jpg

Advertisements
 

Week #28 -Deconstruction……..

This week we’ve deviated from our “one recipe” and decided to do some food deconstruction. following is an explanation for all of you non-foodies out there.  To make things more challenging, we gave each other the task; we couldn’t choose it ourselves.

Food deconstruction: At heart, any deconstructed dish should contain all the classic components found in the “original.”  The difference is in the preparation.  When creating a dish utilizing deconstructive techniques, the ingredients are essentially prepared and treated on their own.  It is during the plating and presentation stages that everything is brought together.

Chef Jonathan: Chef Karen chose for me the classic dish, Chicken Pot Pie. I found this challenging, but once I separated each component and started to deconstruct it, thinking about the properties of each, how I could adapt them and make it new, I realized the possibilities were almost endless. I decided to recreate my dish into Lemon Chicken with Garlic Mixed Vegetable Puree and Fleur de Sel & Italian Herb Focaccia. For the chicken I seared two chicken breasts, then placed sliced lemon on top, and put in the oven for about 1/2 hour. Meanwhile, for the puree, I cooked carrots, peas, and corn, then puree in a food processor, adding chicken stock, garlic, parmesan, and salt and pepper to taste. For the focaccia, I took my pate brisee, (you can use Pillsbury Crescent Rolls) rolled it out, cut into rectangles, and I brushed it with an egg wash, then I distributed fleur de sel and italian herbs. I then baked for about 10 minutes, or until golden brown. All in all, a great challenge, and the most important thing about deconstructing, is learning more about the food you’re working with!

Karen: Chef Jonathan gave me Hamburger and French Fries for my task.  I was a bit befuddled but finally figured out what to do.  I started with the “french fries” part.  I shredded some red potatoes, mixed them with egg – to bind them – as well as salt and pepper and chopped garlic.  I then made them into little pancakes and deep fried them to a golden brown.

For the “hamburger” part, I marinated a small steak in BBQ sauce and then bbq’d it on the grill.  I then sliced it up into strips, placed it on top of the potato pancakes and garnished the whole thing with pickles, red onion and tomatoes.  The partakers were allowed to use ketchup where needed. 🙂

The comment made after the first bite was “if you take a pickle, tomato, onion and piece of beef at the same time, it takes like a hamburger.”  Mission accomplished!